Heritage in the News

1 comment

In Heritage Impact

Heritage Commentary

Heritage Cited in Other’s Commentary

  • Foreign Policy cites Heritage’s Index of Economic Freedom regarding India’s economic growth.
  • Ben Domenech quotes from Sen. Mike Lee’s (R-UT) speech at Heritage in Human Events.

Heritage Cited in the News

  • The New York Times profiles Heritage President Jim DeMint’s relationship to Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL).
  • Wired quotes Dean Cheng on the Pentagon using a Chinese satellite firm to help share data.
  • Red Alert Politics covers Michelle Malkin winning the Breitbart Award at Heritage’s Resource Bank conference.

Heritage in the News

1 comment

In Heritage Impact

Heritage Commentary

Heritage Cited in Other’s Commentary

  • Colin Clark cites Dean Cheng on China’s level of military transparency in Aol Defense.
  • Red State quotes James Sherk on recent hires in the Civil Rights Division.
  • Conn Carroll cites The Heritage Foundation on immigration in The Washington Examiner.

Heritage Cited in the News

Heritage in the News

Leave a Comment

In Heritage Impact

Heritage Commmentary

  • Michaela Dodge says the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty was a bad idea in Real Clear Politics.
  • Ed Feulner says freedom is advancing in education through school choice in The Washington Times.
  • Nina Owcharenko discusses problems with Medicaid expansion in National Review Online.
  • Ryan Anderson gives the limited government argument for traditional marriage in The Blaze.

Heritage Cited in Others’ Commentary

  • USA Today cites Heritage list of foiled terrorist attacks in editorial on Boston Marathon Bombing.
  • Matt Lewis of The Daily Caller also cites the Heritage list of foiled terrorist attacks.
  • Matthew Boyle reiterates Jim DeMint’s arguments about the media’s reluctant coverage of the Gosnell abortion trial in Breitbart.com.

Heritage Cited in the News

Heritage in the News

Leave a Comment

In Heritage Impact

Heritage Commentary

Heritage Cited in Other’s Commentary

  • Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) cites Heritage in a column on gun control for CNN.com.
  • Ansuya Harjani quotes Bruce Klingner on North Korea in CNBC.com .
  • Alejandro Chaufen mentions Heritage in a column about think tanks for Forbes.

Heritage Cited in the News

  • The Associated Press references Jack Spencer in an article about the Tennessee Valley Authority.
  • National Journal quotes Nicholas Loris, Jack Spencer, and Katie Tubb on Ernest Moniz’s views on natural gas exports.
  • The Fiscal Times discusses the impact of Heritage’s forthcoming study on immigration.

 

Kansas Takes on Teachers Unions with Commonsense Reform

1 comment

In Heritage Work

Andre Jenny/Newscom

Kansas legislators are moving to implement commonsense education reforms to attract and retain better teachers. Currently under the union negotiated system, layoffs occur based on seniority instead of quality.  The Heritage Foundation’s James Sherk explains :

The pain of union control is illustrated by Bria Klotz, a former sixth-grade teacher in Lawrence, Kansas. She won statewide recognition for her excellence in the classroom. She nonetheless got laid off when Lawrence Public Schools had to make cuts.

Why did she lose out? Her union contract called for seniority-based layoffs, so she was among the first to go. The winners? The more senior union members who got ironclad job security from the contract.

Thanks to Kansas’ right to work law, teachers are no longer forced to pay dues to the Kansas National Education Association. As Sherk points out, many teachers choose not to be a part of the union.

In many of Kansas’s largest school districts—including Wichita and Topeka—not one current teacher voted for Kansas National Education Association (KNEA) representation.

There’s a catch though. All teachers still have to abide by union contracts. Sherk continues:

Kansas legislators are considering changing this. Kansas HB 2027 overhauls collective bargaining in public schools. The bill has attracted attention for limiting what unions can negotiate. Among other changes, it lets districts set teacher evaluation standards without union interference.

Another significant provision has attracted much less attention. The bill requires unions to stand for re-election every two years. Teachers unhappy with their union could vote it out. Even better, the bill also lets teachers negotiate individual contracts. Anyone who loses under the KNEA contract could negotiate a better deal separately.

Predictably, the KNEA has called the bill a “war on teachers.” But what teachers does the bill harm? Certainly not teachers like Klotz.

Kansas’ proposed reform is not a silver bullet for education and reforms should not stop there. But it is an innovative idea and offers another avenue for education improvement to policy makers and will ultimately help students by bringing back quality teachers.

Should teachers be allowed to negotiate their contracts individually?

 

Why North Korea Is a Threat to Itself and the World

Leave a Comment

In Heritage Work

Photo: Newscom

In the latest development in its long history of belligerence, North Korea is threatening  preemptive nuclear attacks against the U.S.

Unfortunately, cuts to defense may limit America’s ability to deter or defend against attack, The Heritage Foundation’s Nick Zahn writes. “The bottom line,” he explains, “is that as U.S. capability erodes, warfighters will be unable to provide the necessary credible deterrence to maintain peace—not just on the Korean peninsula, but elsewhere in the world where the U.S. has critical national interests. Nor in a conflict will they be assured victory with the least possible U.S. and allied casualties.”

But the communist government isn’t just a threat to other countries. It’s a threat to its own people.

Since North Korea is essentially an isolated military slave labor camp for its rulers, information is hard to gather. Hard to gather, but not impossible, as Heritage’s Olivia Enos explains: Continue Reading »

Heritage in the News

Leave a Comment

In Heritage Impact

Heritage Commentary

Heritage Cited in Other’s Commentary

Heritage Cited in the News

How Heritage President Ed Feulner Became Dr. Feulner

Leave a Comment

In Other Work of Note

When Ed Feulner became President of The Heritage Foundation in 1977, he was in his late 30s and had not yet received his doctorate. Nearly a decade before, had set aside his Ph.D. studies in economics at Georgetown to focus on advancing the conservative agenda.

Feulner decided he needed to complete his degree, which he believed would add to Heritage’s credibility.  Switching his focus from economics to political science, Feulner resumed his studies as a distance student at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

In his new book, Leading the Way: The Story of Ed Feulner and the Heritage Foundation, Heritage scholar Lee Edwards relates how Ed Feulner became Dr. Feulner: Continue Reading »

‘Mr. Feulner! I’ve Got the President of the United States on the Telephone!’

Leave a Comment

In Heritage Impact

President Ronald Reagan and Heritage Foundation Ed Feulner developed a close relationship in the early 1980s.

A new book by Heritage scholar Lee Edwards, Leading the Way: The Story of Ed Feulner and the Heritage Foundation, tells a funny story about their relationship.

So when Reagan made the decision to visit communist China in 1984, he made sure he spoke with Feulner upon his return. Reagan would not simply leave a message or send a note but tracked down Feulner while on vacation.

Edwards explains: Continue Reading »

A High-Spending, High-Speed Waste

1 comment

In Heritage Work

Instead of embracing proven transportation solutions, the Obama administration seems bent on embracing yesterday’s tomorrow of high speed rail. And now the government is considering a plan to spend $5.5 billion on a high-speed rail project in California and Nevada.

The Heritage Foundation’s Emily Goff explains:

The train, called XpressWest, would run from Victorville, California, to Las Vegas, Nevada. As Heritage Foundation visiting fellow Wendell Cox notes with skepticism, “Promoters expect people to drive 50 to 100 miles to get to the station and then get off the freeway, park, and board the train for the final 175 miles to Las Vegas.” Translation: Keep on dreaming.

Indeed, the plan’s viability depends on wildly optimistic projections of ridership—four times that of Amtrak’s Acela train on the Northeast Corridor—and accompanying fare box revenues. If they fail to materialize, as Cox’s risk assessment of the project estimates, then the train will be unable to repay the loan, leaving taxpayers on the hook.

Continue Reading »

« Older Entries

What You'll Find Here

  • Heritage Impact - Reports on how Heritage is changing the debate in Washington, in the media, and around the country.
  • Heritage Work - Updates on Heritage Foundation research, analysis and other work to advance conservative principles in Washington and around the country.
  • Member Stories - Profiles of Heritage Foundation members from around the nation featuring their stories and why they support Heritage and conservative ideas.
  • Other Work of Note
  • Member Events