Last week, America marked the 227th anniversary of the ratification of the United States Constitution.

To commemorate this milestone, The Heritage Foundation released the second edition of The Heritage Guide to the Constitution. This new edition includes updates to reflect new laws and court decisions that affect how the nation’s highest law impacts Americans.

The first edition of the Guide, which features clause-by-clause analysis of the entire Constitution from leading scholars, was published in 2005 to critical acclaim. It has sold more than 50,000 copies.

In 2012, Heritage published the full text online. Since then, The Heritage Guide to the Constitution Online has been visited over 1.3 million times. The hard copy of the book has sold over 50,000 copies.

The enormous popularity of our guide is proof of how relevant and revered the Constitution still remains.

Purchase your copy of the Guide‘s second edition, or read the full text online.

Did you celebrate Constitution Day? Tell us what makes you proud to carry on the mantle of liberty.

In early November, The Heritage Foundation will mail our 2015 calendar to all 600,000 Heritage members. And for the first time, this year’s calendar will feature photos taken by Heritage members and supporters.

The 2015 calendar will feature images that tell the story of what we love about America, the things we do outside of government in the cities and towns and countryside where we live, that make us the people we are. So we decided to ask our members for photos they’ve taken that match this theme.

More than 130 Heritage supporters submitted 282 photos in response to our call for submissions earlier this year. Our creative team, who produces the calendar, carefully reviewed all submissions and picked the five photos below.

Watch your mailbox for your Heritage calendar in mid-November!

Here are the photos selected:

January: Sandy Seaman–Austin, TX

Denali National Park, Alaska. Photo: Sandy Seaman

Denali National Park, Alaska Continue Reading »

The Obama administration needs to develop a comprehensive coordinated strategy for defeating ISIS terrorists. Congress must closely analyze whether ISIS, as a legal matter, falls under the 2001 AUMF (authorization for use of military force) given the historical ties between ISIS and al Qaeda.  And if ISIS does not fall under the 2001 AUMF then Congress and the administration must craft an ISIS-specific authorization for use of military force, Heritage Foundation expert Cully Stimson writes in a new report.

The administration “must develop a comprehensive, overarching strategy to confront and ultimately defeat this enemy,” Stimson argues. “Working with our partners and allies and the countries in the region that are most affected by ISIS, the United States must do what it traditionally has done: lead.”

He continues:

The vibrant debate among legal scholars regarding the domestic and international law basis for U.S. military action against ISIS is partly due to the fact that the Administration has yet to provide the public with a clear, comprehensive legal analysis of its power to use military force against ISIS. As a general principle, when a President puts our troops in harm’s way for a sustained period of time, it is advisable for him to propose, consult with, and obtain express authorization from Congress. That consultation and debate should be public, not buried in a continuing resolution or other must-pass legislation. Sending our troops into war requires a sober, deliberate debate that is not influenced by electoral politics.

Do you think the administration needs explicit authorization from Congress to fight ISIS?

Photo: Newscom

Millions of ineligible and invalid registrations pollute American voter rolls, J. Christian Adams writes in a new Heritage Foundation report.

This is in part because the 1993 National Voter Registration Act, popularly known as the Motor Voter Act, has been used largely by liberal interests.

“For most of the history of the law, enforcement actions have been directed against election officials who sought to clean voter rolls and against states for insufficiently pushing voter registration among entitlement recipients,” Adams writes.

The law also empowered liberal activist groups, he continues: Continue Reading »

EPA headquarters in Washington D.C.

EPA headquarters in Washington D.C.

Heritage Foundation legal experts are urging Congress to block the EPA from unilaterally expanding its own power.

In a new legal analysis, Heritage’s Robert Gordon and Andrew Kloster call on our elected leaders to strip agencies of wage garnishment powers:

Congress has a responsibility to protect the constitutional due process rights of all Americans by eliminating or sharply curtailing the authority of agencies to enact wrongheaded wage garnishment regulations.

This summer, the EPA decreed that it would garnish the wages of any “debtors” (according to its own definition) who owe the agency money – all without any court orders.

Heavy-handed EPA fines are not unheard of. In one famous example, the EPA charged a Wyoming family $75,000 per day for building a pond on their own property. Where did the EPA get the authority to regulate streams on private property? Not surprisingly, from itself. The EPA had recently redefined what waters fell under its jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act and applied that definition to the Wyoming pond.

The Heritage Foundation pushed back hard against this unconstitutional seizure of power, filing public comments and writing extensively on the issue. Due in part to Heritage’s influence, the EPA eventually reversed its decision, though it still argues that it has the legal authority to garnish wages if it chooses.

What do you think? Should the EPA be able to set the scope of its own powers? Or should Congress act to stop them?

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